YSP Alumni

’15 | ’16 | ’17 | ’18 | ’19 | ’20 | ’21

2021 YSP Program Coordinators: Gabriella Gonzalez and Franklin Ollivierre III


Participating Labs

LabYSP StudentsTitleAbstract
Faculty:
Amirabadi, Mashid

Mentors:
Junhao Luo, Anran Wei
Ali Noamany,
TBD
Solar ChargerThe students will get familiar with solar modules, and its behavior. They will also design, simulate, and possibly fabricate a charger circuit for charging a cellphone from solar modules.
Faculty:
Hashmi, Sara

Mentor:
Sabrina Marnoto
Logan Armstrong,
Emma Bocquillion
Particulate Flows in Small ChannelsBiological fluids like blood contain a variety of different particle types and suspended components, making their flow behavior both interesting and complicated. Some particles are soft enough to squeeze through channels smaller than themselves, like red blood cells squeezing through capillary vessels. Other particles, like immune cells, are predators, eating dead cells and foreign material that they encounter in the blood stream. When drugs are delivered through the blood, they must survive long enough in the circulatory system so that they reach their targets. In this project, we study multicomponent fluid systems as simplified models for blood flow. The particles in our fluid system vary in both size and in stiffness, to mimic both the variety of cell types in the blood and nanoparticles that could deliver drugs. We investigate flow behavior in narrow channels to understand how different types of possible drug delivery vehicles might travel through blood.
Faculty:
Jornet, Josep

Mentors:
Duschia Bodet, Priyangshu Sen
Andres Scully Morales,
Connie Yang
Designing and Testing New Communications Signals for 6G NetworksWith the commercialization of 5G networks, the race for the future 6G systems becomes more competitive than ever. One of the key building blocks of future wireless networks is the adoption of frequencies above 100 GHz in the electromagnetic spectrum, where large bandwidths are available. As part of this project, the students will design innovative signals that can carry up to 100x more information than current state-of-the-art 5G systems. After introducing the concept of digital modulation and coding in a communication system, numerical tools (such as Matlab or NumPy) will be utilized to define new waveforms. Upon completing the theoretical design and analysis, the students will leverage the world’s first and still one-of-a-kind platform developed by the UN Lab to experimentally test the performance of their designs. The findings of this research will ultimately be published either independently or as part of a larger study set.
Faculty:
Kaeli, David

Mentors:
TBD
Jerry Xia,
Yurika Tarui
Learning about parallel thinking and introductory machine learningTBD
Faculty:
Koppes, Ryan

Mentors:
Kyla Nichols, Katelyn Neuman
Rohan Meier,
Sofia Arboleda
Engineering organs on a chip for human healthIn vitro models are of immeasurable value to researcher for investigating fundamental biological questions but mimicking the 3D tissue architectures remains a large hurdle and has prevent translation of results to the clinic. Microfluidics, mainly through the use of soft lithography, have provided a clear means towards replicating these structures in the dish. However, the prohibitive cost of fabrication and difficulty of use has really hindered the ubiquitous application of these microfluidic systems. Further, functional neural inputs/outputs are often ignored these culture systems due to added complexities. We have recently developed a low cost and robust technique for fabricating 3D fluidic devices layer by layer that overcomes a number of the barriers in the design and application of microphysiological systems. Furthermore, we demonstrate several approaches that may be employed to alleviate nutrient transport concerns, in addition to enhancing real-time inputs/output controls using our GelPinning technique. The inexpensive cost of these systems for creating microphysiological systems of varying geometries will be highly transferable.
Faculty:
Milane, Lara/
Amiji, Mansoor

Mentors:
TBD
Daniel Becker,
Alice Han
Nanotechnology for Drug DeliveryTBD
Faculty:
Onabajo, Marvin

Mentors:
Safaa Abdelfattah
Barthelemy Lagene,
Lanai Carey
Simulation of Analog Circuits for Brain Signal MeasurementsAnalog circuits play a key role during the measurement of biosignals such as electroencephalography (EEG) signals from the brain used for the analysis of many neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sleep disorders and coma. Perpetual monitoring and processing of EEG signals helps the treatment inside and outside of the hospital environment. However, to obtain high-quality information it is necessary to amplify the desired signals of interest and to remove unwanted interference signals and noise. In this project, the goal is to investigate a digitally-programmable analog filter that enhances brain signal measurements depending on the frequency range of interest. The participants will become familiar with fundamental electronic circuit analysis, design and simulation concepts. They will learn how to modify an analog filter and to evaluate its effectiveness through computer simulations.
Faculty:
Platt, Robert

Mentors:
David Klee, Dian Wang
Joseph Durasingh,
Abigail Lussier
Bin Packing with Industrial Robotic ArmHave you ever gotten a package where the box was much bigger than the item inside? This empty space adds up, resulting in higher financial costs and unnecessary environmental burdens. In this project, students will develop algorithms to more effectively place items for shipping. Students will send commands to a virtual robot and watch it manipulate items in a simulator. This project will allow students to develop their programming skills and knowledge of robotics.
Faculty:
Su, Lili

Mentors:
TBD
Jedidiah Nelson,
Yelissa Burgos
Self-driving cars control that is robust to environmental error-prone human driversTBD
Faculty:
Tiwari, Devesh

Mentors:
TBD
Shoumik Kundu,
Kirya Caine
Quantum Computing: What and Why?Experiment with real quantum computers to know what they do well and what they can't do well.
Faculty:
Willits, Rebecca

Mentors:
Yang Hu
Stefan Nguyen,
Claire Stipp
Schwann cell migration guided by concentration gradients of laminin-derived peptidesNeuroregeneration following peripheral nerve injury is largely mediated by Schwann cells (SC), the principal glial cell that supports neurons in the peripheral nervous system. Axonal regeneration in vivo is limited by the extent of SC migration into the gap between the proximal and distal nerve, however, little is known regarding the principal driving forces for SC migration. Engineered microenvironments, such as molecular and protein gradients, play a role in the migration of many cell types, including cancer cells and fibroblasts. However, haptotactic strategies have not been applied widely to SC. Herein, a series of tethered laminin-derived peptides were analyzed for their influence on SC adhesion, proliferation, and alignment. Concentration gradient sub- strates were fabricated using a controlled vapor deposition method, followed by covalent peptide attachment via a thiol-ene reaction, and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and MALDI-MS imaging. While tethered RGD peptides supported SC adhesion and proliferation, concentration gradients of RGD had little influence on biased SC directional migration. In contrast, YIGSR promoted less SC attachment than RGD, yet YIGSR peptide gradients directed migration with a strong bias to the concentration profile. With YIGSR peptide, overall speed increased with the steepness of the peptide concentration profile. YIGSR gradients had no hap- totactic effect on rat dermal fibroblast migration, in contrast to fibroblast migration on RGD gradients. The response of SC to these tethered peptide gradients will guide the development of translationally relevant con- structs designed to facilitate endogenous SC infiltration into defects for nerve regeneration.